Beauty Restored – The benefits of facial Gua Sha

Transform your complexion with our facial massage techniques

 

Written on your face

You can tell a lot about someone just by looking at their face.

Not just the expression their pulling, or the immediate mood they happen to be in. But health and wellbeing is also written on your face.

That’s because, according to Chinese medicine, your beauty is an external reflection of your internal health.

So, here at Hayo’u our beauty routines are about making positive improvements to your health. Our founder and resident medical practitioner, Katie, has captured the essence of thousands of years of Chinese wisdom into a series of powerful one-minute rituals.

Simple and quick to do, they fit neatly into our modern lives, offering a transformative approach to health and wellbeing.

And in turn, giving you a healthy, glowing and radiant complexion.

Restore your beauty

We’re going to show you three iconic Chinese techniques for improving your complexion. We’ve refined them so you they can be done in just one minute each.

They are: Àn fa (press-hold) Gua sha (press stroke) and Acupressure (press-turn).

All you need to get started is our sleek Hayo’u Beauty RestorerTM . Made from Xiuyan jade, it’s been used in Chinese facial massage for thousands of years, and revered for its restorative, cooling properties.

Our studies showed that 82% of women saw an immediate, positive effect after just one-minute’s use.

Àn fa

In this technique you simply need to press and hold the jade Beauty RestorerTM over your face. Press-holding the jade is known to reduce inflammation and boost lymphatic drainage.

You can hold the Beauty RestorerTM over the eyes to relieve fatigue, alleviate eye bags, puffy eyes or twitching eye muscles. You can also use the jade tool over any area to alleviate stress-related symptoms such as headache, flushing, skin conditions and throbbing temples.

Gua sha

Gua sha is a simple press and stroke technique along the contours of your face, as shown.

This beauty treatment has been used across Asia for thousands of years. It’s renowned for its  unique ability to increase circulation under the skin, bringing in nutrients and boosting collagen.

So, rather than applying a cream or serum to improve your skin from the outside, you’re activating your body to nourish your skin in a more deep and meaningful way.

In fact, this self-massage technique has been shown in studies to boost circulation by 400%. It stimulates the dermis to support collagen production, manipulating areas of tension to relax facial muscles, exponentially increases blood and lymphatic flow. All this leads to a brighter, healthier, more radiant complexion.

Acupressure

Activating acupressure points on your face is a great way to support your organs internally. Chinese medicine recognises that facial beauty is linked to the organs in this way – the state of your health literally reflected in your face.

What’s going on?

  • Working the points at the sides of the lips tightens the skin
  • Pressing the sides of the nose aids elimination of waste and relieves Sinusitis
  • Pressing the sides of the eyes releases stress and tension and alleviates headaches
  • Pressing under the eyes helps reduce eye bags and brightens the eyes
  • Pressing the chin relaxes the jaw
  • Pressing the forehead is a great point for stress relief

 

Katie’s Beauty Restorer Ritual

Katie has distilled these three ancient Chinese techniques into a powerful one-minute ritual to release deeply-held tension, boost circulation and leave you with glowing, radiant skin.

Check out the ritual now

 


Supporting studies:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2796.2010.02321.x/full#js-feedback

Breathing, inflammation and the vagus nerve

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21158977

Assessment of the Effects of Pranayama/Alternate Nostril Breathing on the Parasympathetic Nervous System in Young Adults.

Anant Narayan Sinha – Published 2013 in the Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3681046/

Gua sha and microcirculation

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17905355

http://www.pacificcollege.edu/news/press-releases/2015/05/05/science-gua-sha

Effects of Gua sha on Heart Rate Variability in Healthy Male Volunteers under Normal Condition and Weightlifters after Weightlifting Training Sessions

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4433678/

Gua sha therapy could facilitate the parasympathetic nervous activity and modulate the balance between parasympathetic and sympathetic activities

 

 

 

Real People. Real Results